No Hiding Place

Every good person’s life has significance in the renewal, whatever arena they are born into or are motivated to move into. Good is often thought of as a character trait, and even something people can get vain about, but today I’m going to give it a little more weight than that. We can place it in the heart, alongside courage. No goodie-two-shoes in that duo.

Let’s just jump in there and say that we’re born into a time where evil has already reached its apex and it’s now well into collapse… which means it has gone into overdrive in an attempt to maintain its hold. It also means that if we stand strong, no despair no anger no fear, it will consume itself. The uncovering of evil isn’t a pretty sight, it might affect us in ways we’re not happy about, but it brings forth a cleansing that allows for renewal to flourish.

As I say this, I’m recalling the lyrics of an old song… a spiritual sung by a people who needed to interpret the Bible as being a promise of what happens when Good returns: There’s no hidin’ place down here, you know, there’s no hidin’ place down here. I went to the rock to hide my face but the rock cried out, no… no hidin’ place down here.

I don’t often use the word God, as it seems like Source, or Force, or All that Is, or Divinity are words and phrases less likely to lead to images of an external person in the sky who runs the show. Interestingly, we don’t need a red-faced Satan or an old man God. Truth or Deceit, Love or Disdain – these are human ways of being.

Moving into the motivation for this train of thought: the decision of a ‘truth teller’ activist to leave the physical plane. Michael C. Ruppert’s birth into a CIA-connected family and life as a person who simply wanted to do right, led him into an extraordinary familiarity with government deception and disdain for human life. It was not something he could walk on by, and I am very thankful that he didn’t.

I took notice of him when he became an instrument of truth regarding Iran Contra and the CIA connection to the crack cocaine epidemic in LA. I was living in LA when the epidemic began. No one knew what it would do in the beginning, and no one knew the black community had been targeted or why. But we would soon see the effects.

My husband and I watched a friend of the family become so addicted that he spent an entire months’ paycheck in one night; we watched a happy, healthy young woman become a prostitute. We saw it encroaching on Venice Beach, where we lived, and we escaped the scene and moved to the Midwest.

Through the goodness, bravery and scholarship of Michael Ruppert, we would find out that the ‘system’ had enjoyed a win, win, win… for a time: take down the force of liberation consciousness within the black community, fund secret CIA operations, and provide liquidity to the banks.

Michael Ruppert continued uncovering the truth for years, and he undoubtedly played a role in the collapse we are now seeing. In one of his speeches he described the painful loss of innocence when he slowly came to the realization that his country was really, really dirty. He said when he finally realized the scope of it he was ready to give up… but he found that he couldn’t give up.

In this quote we can see his depth of familiarity with what appeared to be the stranglehold of evil over good: “And I’ll tell you that there were times in 20 years that I had incredible depressions, incredible heartache, incredible disillusionment, utter hopelessness, knowing and believing that I was going to die and never see a day of justice. And I tell you I think I’m beginning to understand how a slave felt knowing that he was going to die and neither he or his children would ever see a day of freedom.”

In light of this, we might ask what sustained the people spiritually during trans-generational slavery? It wasn’t memory of the ancestors, for that was forcibly removed. For many generations it wasn’t even the promise of good found in the Bible, for that comfort was denied. But there are wise men who know. They say it was the Black woman… something deep and abiding and eternal in her. The one who gave birth was comforting and tenacious even when all hope was lost.

Everyone who has followed the work of Michael Ruppert, knows that he took his own life in the most noble manner that he could find. Make of it what you will… I’ll take it to be what he intended it to be.

He had a strong affinity with Native (Lakota) ways, and within this culture there are beliefs in ways of sustaining life during the most trying times. We are well aware that Indigenous cultures also hold feminine wisdom in high regard, and this was expressed by Mr. Ruppert: “We need to listen. We need to stop looking in the wrong direction.”

If I could add anything to that, I would say, look to the feminine spirit within yourself. Ask for the wisdom that comes from long experience of carrying many things… for the sake of the children.

Bless the good people, each and every one. All Light shines through in the end.

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